The recent warm weather has finally helped the morel mushroom season get going. The Iowa DNR has shared that officers have spotted morels growing in abundance. The cherished fungi typically pop up in the spring with the moist soil as the weather warms during the day but with cool nights.

Photo Credit: Getty
Photo Credit: Getty
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According to the Iowa DNR website, dead Elm trees are Morel magnets. As are old apple orchards. See the DNR 50 Tips to Spot Morels.

Photo Credit: John Snyder
Photo Credit: John Snyder
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But what makes the Morel Mushroom so popular?

The morel mushroom has avid fans because of its unique yet subtle earthy flavor. The Morel will appear in various colors and shapes and can resemble a honeycomb. They're only grown in the wild, making it a somewhat rare food, unlike the typical mushrooms available in the grocery store.

The Morel Mushroom has a meaty texture. As a result, they are a desired ingredient among mushroom enthusiasts, foodies, and culinary chefs.

The cherished mushroom is not to be eaten raw, so search online for a preferred recipe.

However, simple preparation may yield a tasty treat. It's best to clean just before cooking as the fungi absorb water, which may turn the mushroom moldy.

Inspect the Morel for any debris or insects, rinse, dry with a paper towel, trim the stems, and slice lengthwise for best results.

Morel mushroom in the frying pan
Photo Credit: Jack VandenHeuvel
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Sear the Morel in a cast iron pan with oil and a tablespoon on high heat to brown the mushroom. They will soften like other mushrooms. Add shallots and garlic, finish with a generous amount of butter, and season with a bit of salt and pepper. Fresh herbs and a squeeze of a lemon may also enhance the flavors.

Happy Morel hunting and cooking!

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